British English – American English: Clothes (vocabulary)


Video credit: WatchandLearnEnglish, “English Clothes Vocabulary | British & American English” September 4, 2012, via YouTube.

Dear All,
This post continues exploring differences in vocabulary between BrE and AmE. This video discusses the topic of clothes which is one of the most important topics because this is something we use every day. It is necessary to note that certain words describing items of clothes had already existed in English before it was introduced to North America while others were coined at a later stage when AmE formed as a distinctive variety. This means that some words are the same in BrE and AmE while others may be quite different. Modern means of communication, particularly the Web, allow people to communicate instantly and in this way lexical exchange occurs between BrE and AmE. Modern means of communication began to develop rapidly only in the second half of the 20th century. Until this time BrE and AmE had been developing relatively independently. This resulted in quite a lot of differences related to the topic in question. The list below adds to the words discussed in the video and reflects some of the major differences between BrE and AmE:

bonnet (clothing) – hat* (BP, 2014; OD, 2014; CDO, 2014; MW, 2014; ABBY Lingvo, 2014)**
bootlace, shoelace – shoestring
bowler, hard hat – derby
braces – suspenders
briefs, underpants – [jockey] shorts
checked/chequered – checkered
clothes peg – clothespin
dressing-gown – (bath)robe
dungarees – overalls
jumper, jersey, pullover, sweater – sweater
mac/macintosh/mackintosh – rain coat
nappy – diaper
pants, underwear, knickers – underwear, panties
pinafore dress – jumper
pinny (pinafore), apron – apron
plimsolls – tennis/gym shoes, sneakers
polo neck – turtle neck
suspenders – holds up stockings
swimming costume – bathing suit
tights – pantyhose
trainers – sneakers
trousers – pants
vest – undershirt
waistcoat – vest
wellington boots/wellies – galoshes
zip – zipper

In summary, this post has concentrated on the topic of clothes and pointed out some major differences in vocabulary between BrE and AmE. The following post will continue exploring differences in vocabulary between BrE and AmE and will focus on the topic of food.

See similar posts:

  1. British English – American English: Pronunciation
  2. British English – American English: Spelling
  3. British English – American English: Education (vocabulary)
  4. British English – American English: Transportation (vocabulary)
  5. British English – American English: Food (vocabulary)
  6. British English – American English: Miscellaneous (vocabulary)
  7. British English – American English: Units of measurement (vocabulary)
  8. British English – American English: Idioms (vocabulary)
  9. British English – American English: Verbs (grammar)
  10. British English – American English: Nouns (grammar)
  11. British English – American English: Prepositions (grammar)

References
ABBYY Lingvo (2014). Retrieved February 21, 2014 from, http://www.lingvo-online.ru/en
Cambridge Dictionaries Online (CDO) (2014). Retrieved February 21, 2014 from, http://dictionary.cambridge.org/
Merriam-Webster (MW) (2014). Retrieved February 21, 2014, from http://www.merriam-webster.com/
Oxford Dictionaries (OD) (2014). Retrieved February 21, 2014, from http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/
Project Britain (BP) (2014). Retrieved February 21, 2014, from http://projectbritain.com/americanbritish.html

*Bold type is used for AmE words.
**These sources have been consulted here and further in this post.

Iaroslav

Advertisements

12 Comments

    Trackbacks

    1. British English – American English: Food (vocabulary) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    2. British English – American English: Pronunciation | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    3. British English – American English: Spelling | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    4. British English – American English: Education (vocabulary) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    5. British English – American English: Transportation (vocabulary) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    6. British English – American English: Food (vocabulary) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    7. British English – American English: Units of measurement (vocabulary) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    8. British English – American English: Prepositions (grammar) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    9. British English – American English: Nouns (grammar) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    10. British English – American English: Verbs (grammar) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    11. British English – American English: Idioms (vocabulary) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS
    12. British English – American English: Miscellaneous (vocabulary) | BLOG|ON|LINGUISTICS

    Leave a Reply/Comment

    Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

    WordPress.com Logo

    You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

    Twitter picture

    You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

    Facebook photo

    You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

    Google+ photo

    You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

    Connecting to %s

    %d bloggers like this: