Tag Archives: American

Setup – set-up – set up

Dear All, How do you spell the word “setup”? The answer is: it depends: if “setup” is a noun or used in the attributive function, as an adjective (before another noun), then it is spelled as one word with or without a hyphen: The setup (or set-up) of my phone is easy to use. I …

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Opposite – opposite from – accross from

Dear All, The use of the word “opposite” can be quite confusing particularly for learners of English; therefore, in order to help out those who may questions concerning its use, this post discusses how this word can be used in standard English. To begin with, it is worth mentioning that the word “opposite” can be …

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CELPIP: Canadian English Language Test

Dear All, Besides TOEFL and IELTS, learners of English can take CELPIP test to prove their language proficiency. Today I would like to discuss some of the characteristic features of CELPIP and how it compares to TOEFL and IELTS. Definition. To begin with, what is CELPIP? CELPIP or Canadian English Language Test is a type …

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Sir Richard Francis Burton spoke 24 languages

  Did you know that Sir Richard Francis Burton spoke at least 24 languages?       Sir Richard Francis Burton was the translator of “The Arabian Nights” into English and a polyglot. The languages he spoke are: Amharic, Arabic, Aramaic, Asante, Egba, English, Fan, French, German, Greek, Hebrew, Hindustani (Sindhi and Urdu), Icelandic, Italian, …

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Argot, jargon, professionalism, and slang

Dear All, Argo, jargon, professionalism, and slang are the terms which are used not only by linguists, but by people with any other background in their everyday life. The everyday use of these terms contributes to the fact that sometimes these terms are used interchangeably. Even linguists who do not work closely with these notions …

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Similar flags

Dear All, This post looks into some similar flags of the world. Some of the flags are less similar than others. At the same time it may be interesting to compare them and in this way to avoid confusion. The flags below are posted in the alphabetical order. Australian – New Zealand: Bangladeshi – Japanese …

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British English – American English: Prepositions (grammar)

Image credit: Mode de Vie Software, “Prepositions” December 6, 2010, via Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. Dear All, This post compares BrE and AmE use of prepositions and discusses some other relevant differences between these two language varieties. I would like to start with prepositions. Prepositions are short words which serve to indicate relations between words …

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British English – American English: Nouns (grammar)

Image credit: Mode de Vie Software, “Nouns” December 6, 2010, via Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. Dear All, This post continues exploring grammatical differences between BrE and AmE. Specifically, I would like to focus on nouns. There are two major points of interest in this respect: collective nouns and the use of articles. First of all, …

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British English – American English: Verbs (grammar)

Image credit: Mode de Vie Software, “Conjunctions” August 12, 2009, via Flickr, CC BY-NC-ND 2.0. Dear All, The previous several posts have been examining differences between BrE and AmE and have covered such aspects as pronunciation, spelling, and vocabulary. The next three posts are going to deal with another important aspect – grammar. Grammar is the …

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British English – American English: Idioms (vocabulary)

Video credit: GrammarSongs by Melissa, “Idioms Song (Idioms by Melissa)” August 12, 2013, via YouTube. Dear All, This post finishes the series of posts comparing vocabularies of BrE and AmE. Today I would like to discuss one of my favourite topics, phraseology. One of my course papers at the University was devoted to this doubtlessly …

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British English – American English: Units of measurement (vocabulary)

Dear All, One more interesting aspect of the vocabularies of BrE and AmE is units of measurements. As it is known, numbers require precision; otherwise, one can find him/herself in a situation where s/he is late for an important meeting, underpaid or overpays his/her bill. In order to avoid these or similar situations, it is …

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British English – American English: Miscellaneous (vocabulary)

Dear All, In the previous post, the topic of food has been discussed and some major differences between BrE and AmE have been pointed out. The present post continues exploring the vocabulary of the two language varieties and focuses on such topics as: people and home/buildings as well as some other words in common use. …

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